The Martini Diaries – Episode 2

In which I re-discover classic 1980s American mystery TV, attend the Georgia National Day Reception as guest of their Ambassador to the UK, review ‘ What If’ on Netflix, add two new knitted silk ties to my growing collection, finally finish and review 2 Churchill biographies (and the latest Jeffrey Archer thriller), and discover the Milanese Gin and Tonic.

Monday May 27th 2019

Over the weekend I ordered a DVD box set of 22 episodes from the final season of the American TV series ‘Hart to Hart’. They arrived today, and my wife and I have just spent a very pleasant 45 minutes watching the first episode. Continue reading “The Martini Diaries – Episode 2”

The International Churchill Society – celebrating individualism

This week I attended a champagne reception for the International Churchill Society (of which I am member) at the Hyatt Regency London – The Churchill. The event launched the new Churchill book ‘How Churchill Waged War’ by ‘Allen Packwood’. The evening was opened by Randolph Churchill, and then Mr Packwood provided an overview of his book and the research he had undertaken into the subject (he is the senior archivist at Churchill College).IMG_1813

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Inspect, not expect – a vital leadership lesson

I have been reading William Manchester and Paul Reid’s book ‘Defender of the Realm’ – the final book in the ‘Last Lion’ trilogy biography of Winston Churchill. It is an exhaustively researched and detailed account of Churchill’s life in World War Two. When Churchill became Prime Minister in 1940 he was 65 years old and during the next 5 years of leading the country in war suffered at least 3 heart attacks or minor strokes. He also developed pneumonia twice. Yet he emerged from his exertions in 1945 70 years old, victorious, lived another 20 years and became known as arguably the greatest ever Englishman!

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Building a creative culture

With the increase in popularity, and effectiveness, of ‘working from home’ as a standard operating procedure in many not-for-profit organisations clear instructions from you as the leader are always needed to establish a creative environment. Moreover, my organisation, which has members/impact in 87 countries across the world, often sees my staff travelling and operating in different time zones and often the other side of the world where they need to have the flexibility to make decisions and not waste time.

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